Posts Tagged ‘Civil Rights’

59 years ago today, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus!

Posted By Levi

December 1st, 2014 11:09am

December 1, 1955,  Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat, sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott and  start of the Civil Rights Movement. And here, she is arrested after refusing to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger.   Here is the police report when she was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama.  President Obama on the Rosa Parks bus at the Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, MI FollowShare Share this:EmailTweetShare on TumblrPrintMoreLike this:Like Loading... Read More

Listen to Dr. Martin Luther King’s Favorite Song!

Posted By Levi

August 29th, 2013 6:21pm

According to writer, Robert Wright, this was said to be Martin Luther King’s favorite hymn. It is, indeed, a beautiful song. Lyrics below. Precious Lord, take my hand Lead me on, let me stand I am tired, I am weak, I am worn Through the storm, through the night Lead me on to the light Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home When my way grows drear Precious Lord linger near When my life is almost gone Hear my cry, hear my call Hold my hand lest I fall Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home When the darkness appears And the night draws near And the day is past and gone At the river I stand Guide my feet, hold my hand Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home Precious Lord, take my hand Lead me on, let me stand I’m tired, I’m weak, I’m lone Through the storm, through the night Lead me on to the light Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home FollowShare Share this:EmailTweetShare on TumblrPrintMoreLike this:Like Loading... Read More

The Inspiring History of the Song ‘We Shall Overcome’

Posted By Levi

August 28th, 2013 7:40pm

From NPR’s All Things Considered: It is not a marching song. It is not necessarily defiant. It is a promise: “We shall overcome someday. Deep in my heart, I do believe.” It has been a civil rights song for 50 years now, heard not just in the U.S. but in North Korea, in Beirut, in Tiananmen Square, in South Africa’s Soweto Township. But “We Shall Overcome” began as a folk song, a work song. Slaves in the fields would sing, ‘I’ll be all right someday.’ It became known in the churches. A Methodist minister, Charles Albert Tindley, published a version in 1901: “I’ll Overcome Someday.” The first political use came in 1945 in Charleston, S.C. There was a strike against the American Tobacco Co. The workers wanted a raise; they were making 45 cents an hour. They marched and sang together on the picket line, “We will overcome, and we will win our rights someday.” . . . On March 15, 1965, President Lyndon Johnso Read More