Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

Where Does Our Food Come From?

Posted By Levi

March 19th, 2014 7:48pm

Category: Food, Health Care

Where does our food come from? Often the answer is Tyson Foods, America’s meat factory. Tyson, one of the nation’s 100 biggest companies, slaughters 135,000 head of cattle a week, along with 391,000 hogs and an astonishing 41 million chickens. Nearly all Americans regularly eat Tyson meat — at home, at McDonalds, at a cafeteria, at a nursing home. A few days ago, New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof, wrote about the factory farm system that produces most of the foods Americans eat today and it is not pretty. He wrote that the system has been  catastrophe for animals. Chickens are bred to grow huge breasts so that as adults they topple forward and can barely breathe or stand. Besides, . . .  factory farming endangers our health. Robert Martin of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health notes that a farm with 10,000 hogs produces as much fecal waste as a small city with 40,000 people, but the hog operation won’t have a waste treatment plant. Indeed, the ho Read More

Where Does Your Food Come From?

Posted By Levi

February 26th, 2014 8:03pm

Category: Food, Uncategorized

California, supplier of nearly half of all US fruits, veggies, and nuts, is on track to experience the driest year in the past half millennium. Farms use about 80 percent of the state’s “developed water,” or water that’s moved from its natural source to other areas via pipes and aqueducts. As this map  shows, much of California’s agriculture is concentrated in the parts of the state that the drought has hit the hardest. For example: Monterey County, which is currently enduring an “exceptional drought,” according to the US Drought Monitor, grew nearly half of America’s lettuce and broccoli in 2012. Continue reading . .  Twitter: Levianthony123 FollowShare Share this:EmailTweetShare on TumblrPrintMoreLike this:Like Loading... Read More

You Just Threw Out a Perfectly Good Gallon of Milk Because You Think the “Sell By” Date Means Something

Posted By Levi

September 24th, 2013 6:43pm

Category: Food

Admit it: When you see milk past the “sell by” date in your fridge you’re apt to skip the smell test and throw that stuff out. What you might not know is that the date is actually meant for store stockers to keep track of product rotation. It offers little indication of when the milk may actually sour. You wouldn’t be alone in tossing out perfectly good milk. Nine out of 10 Americans needlessly throw away edible, unspoiled food based on “use by,” “sell by,” and “best before” labels, according to a report released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Law School. The problem of wasted food is serious and multifaceted. . . .  a whopping one-third of the global food supply is wasted. Not only that, but this discarded food is responsible for 3.3 gigatons of greenhouse gas emissions. If food waste were a country, it would be the third worst carbon-emitting country on the planet after China and the United S Read More

How The World Manages to Waste Half its Food

Posted By Levi

January 23rd, 2013 8:18pm

Category: Food

A stunning new report from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers points out that between 30 and 50 percent of all the food that’s produced on the planet is lost and wasted without ever reaching human stomachs. Here are some of the details from the report: • A survey in India showed that at least 40% of all its fruit and vegetables is lost between grower and consumer due to lack of refrigerated transport, poor roads, inclement weather and corruption. • In mature, developed economies such as the UK and USA … entire crops, or portions of crops, can be rejected prior to harvest on the grounds of physical appearance. As a result of these factors, up to 30% of the UK vegetable crop is never harvested. • Many less-developed nations are located in the warmer, hotter regions of the world, such as India and Africa where post harvest losses of fruit and vegetables can range between 35–50% annually, and these countries lack the engineered infrastructure required to facilitate such Read More